Thursday, November 09, 2006

So... You want to bug-out, eh?


"Choose... But choose wisely."


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United States

HISPANIC POPULATION

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MissouriIowaMinnesotaOklahomaKansasNebraskaSouth DakotaNorth DakotaColoradoNew MexicoIllinoisWisconsinArkansasLouisianaMississippiAlabamaTennesseeGeorgiaSouth CarolinaNorth CarolinaIndianaKentuckyOhioViginiaWest VirginiaMarylandDelawarePennsylvaniaNew YorkMaineNew JerseyConnecticutRhode IslandMassachusettsVermontNew HampshireArizonaUtahWyomingMontanaHawaiiAlaskaMichiganFloridaTexasNevadaIdahoWashingtonOregonCalifornia

12.5 percent of respondents to the 2000 Census identified themselves as Hispanic, up from 9.0 percent in 1990, making them one of the fastest growing demographic groups in the United States. The "Hispanic ethnicity" category on the Census includes Mexicans (7.3 percent of the total U.S. population in 2000), Puerto Ricans (1.2 percent), Cubans (0.4 percent) and a host of other Latin and South American ethnicities. For more information on racial distribution in the United states, please see our map on geographic variations by race or our racial and ethnic profile, which includes data on the racial characteristics of the Hispanic population.

Source: Census 2000 analyzed by the Social Science Data Analysis Network (SSDAN).


AFRICAN-AMERICAN POPULATION

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MissouriIowaMinnesotaOklahomaKansasNebraskaSouth DakotaNorth DakotaColoradoNew MexicoIllinoisWisconsinArkansasLouisianaMississippiAlabamaTennesseeGeorgiaSouth CarolinaNorth CarolinaIndianaKentuckyOhioViginiaWest VirginiaMarylandDelawarePennsylvaniaNew YorkMaineNew JerseyConnecticutRhode IslandMassachusettsVermontNew HampshireArizonaUtahWyomingMontanaHawaiiAlaskaMichiganFloridaTexasNevadaIdahoWashingtonOregonCalifornia

African Americans comprise the United States' largest racial minority, accounting for 12.1 percent of the total population in 2000. This population is concentrated largely in the southern states and urban areas.

Source: Census 2000 analyzed by the Social Science Data Analysis Network (SSDAN).


ASIAN POPULATION

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MissouriIowaMinnesotaOklahomaKansasNebraskaSouth DakotaNorth DakotaColoradoNew MexicoIllinoisWisconsinArkansasLouisianaMississippiAlabamaTennesseeGeorgiaSouth CarolinaNorth CarolinaIndianaKentuckyOhioViginiaWest VirginiaMarylandDelawarePennsylvaniaNew YorkMaineNew JerseyConnecticutRhode IslandMassachusettsVermontNew HampshireArizonaUtahWyomingMontanaHawaiiAlaskaMichiganFloridaTexasNevadaIdahoWashingtonOregonCalifornia

For Census purposes, the racial category Asian inclues Asian Indians, Chinese, Fillipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, and a number of other Asian ethnicities. In 2000, all these groups together accounted for 3.6 percent of the total U.S. population, up from 2.8 percent in 1990. For more information on racial distribution in the United states, please see our map on geographic variations by race or our racial and ethnic profile.

Source: Census 2000 analyzed by the Social Science Data Analysis Network (SSDAN)


NATIVE HAWAIIANS AND PACIFIC ISLANDERS

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MissouriIowaMinnesotaOklahomaKansasNebraskaSouth DakotaNorth DakotaColoradoNew MexicoIllinoisWisconsinArkansasLouisianaMississippiAlabamaTennesseeGeorgiaSouth CarolinaNorth CarolinaIndianaKentuckyOhioViginiaWest VirginiaMarylandDelawarePennsylvaniaNew YorkMaineNew JerseyConnecticutRhode IslandMassachusettsVermontNew HampshireArizonaUtahWyomingMontanaHawaiiAlaskaMichiganFloridaTexasNevadaIdahoWashingtonOregonCalifornia

The 2000 Census was the first census to record native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders as a race distinct from Asians as a whole. The population identified as Pacific Islander/Native Hawaiian, about .1 percent of the total U.S. population, is primarily located on the West Coast.

Source: Census 2000 analyzed by the Social Science Data Analysis Network (SSDAN).


AMERICAN INDIAN POPULATION

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MissouriIowaMinnesotaOklahomaKansasNebraskaSouth DakotaNorth DakotaColoradoNew MexicoIllinoisWisconsinArkansasLouisianaMississippiAlabamaTennesseeGeorgiaSouth CarolinaNorth CarolinaIndianaKentuckyOhioViginiaWest VirginiaMarylandDelawarePennsylvaniaNew YorkMaineNew JerseyConnecticutRhode IslandMassachusettsVermontNew HampshireArizonaUtahWyomingMontanaHawaiiAlaskaMichiganFloridaTexasNevadaIdahoWashingtonOregonCalifornia

According to the 2000 Census, American Indians and Alaskan Natives made up slightly less than one percent of the total U.S. population. As the maps shows, this population tends to be concentrated in specific geographic areas, often those designated as reservations by the U.S. government, rather than distributed through the nation as a whole.

Source: Census 2000 analyzed by the Social Science Data Analysis Network (SSDAN).


MULTIRACIAL POPULATION

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MissouriIowaMinnesotaOklahomaKansasNebraskaSouth DakotaNorth DakotaColoradoNew MexicoIllinoisWisconsinArkansasLouisianaMississippiAlabamaTennesseeGeorgiaSouth CarolinaNorth CarolinaIndianaKentuckyOhioViginia West VirginiaMarylandDelawarePennsylvaniaNew YorkMaineNew JerseyConnecticutRhode IslandMassachusettsVermontNew HampshireArizonaUtahWyomingMontanaHawaiiAlaskaMichiganFloridaTexasNevadaIdahoWashingtonOregonCalifornia

In 2000 the Census allowed people to select multiple races to identify themselves. In other words, the race question said to "mark one or more races" instead of just one. 2.4% of Americans opted to check off multiple races. It's difficult to make sense of the results. On the one hand, it means that there are now 63 different race categories -- or 126 if you take into account the Hispanic question. Take a look at all the categories in the list associated with this table. On the other hand, roughly one-fifth of the people who selected multiple races were Hispanics who chose both "White" and "Other." These responses are difficult to interpret, because many Hispanics select "Other" and then write in "Hispanic," "Latino," or a national origin. This reflects both a different conception of "race" among Hispanics and a confusing questionnaire. If, say, Anglos had a similar conception, many might choose "White" and "Other," writing in "German" or "British." It is hard to avoid comparing apples and oranges when looking at multiple race data.

The above map of where these 2.4% of Americans who identify with multiple races live may cast some light on the matter. You'll see that these people cluster primarily in a handful of areas -- notably, Hawaii, California, Alaska, and Oklahoma. More interesting is that the multiple race combinations in each of these areas are quite distinct. In Hawaii, the most common combination is Asian and Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander; in California, it is White and Some Other Race; and, in Alaska and Oklahoma, it is White and American Indian. This just goes to show that "Multiracial America" is not a simple product of urban melting pots, but a wide-ranging and far from uniform phenomenon.

Source: Census 2000 analyzed by the Social Science Data Analysis Network (SSDAN).


NON-HISPANIC WHITE POPULATION

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MissouriIowaMinnesotaOklahomaKansasNebraskaSouth DakotaNorth DakotaColoradoNew MexicoIllinoisWisconsinArkansasLouisianaMississippiAlabamaTennesseeGeorgiaSouth CarolinaNorth CarolinaIndianaKentuckyOhioViginiaWest VirginiaMarylandDelawarePennsylvaniaNew YorkMaineNew JerseyConnecticutRhode IslandMassachusettsVermontNew HampshireArizonaUtahWyomingMontanaHawaiiAlaskaMichiganFloridaTexasNevadaIdahoWashingtonOregonCalifornia

Non-Hispanic whites account for 69.1 percent of the U.S. population, according to the 2000 Census data. However, because the non-white population is heavily clustered in relatively few counties, the median U.S. county has a population that is 79.6% non-Hispanic white.

Source: Census 2000 analyzed by the Social Science Data Analysis Network (SSDAN).



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